How to Organize Your Child’s Closet, Age By Age

Organizing your child’s closet is an investment of time that will pay dividends. Not only will you be able to find what you need; so will your child, and that can put an end to questions that start with, “Mom, where’s my … ?” They key is to use tools that are age-appropriate and properly scaled, so that your child can use them.

Babies and Toddlers

In the nursery, hanging organizers keep clothing and supplies handy. When there’s a place for everything, it’s easy to put everything in its place—and find it quickly. Baby clothes are small, so you don’t need a lot of room to keep things tidy. Utilize hanging organizers that allow you to neatly store clothing, diapers, shoes and supplies.

Preschool

Help kids develop good organizing habits by designing their closet with them in mind. This is the age when kids will want to practice independence. Set them up for success by making their closet kid-friendly. Put things at their eye level by using a hanging rod extension or a small set of drawers or bins on the closet floor. Make things easy by only storing clothing of the right size and season. Label drawers or bins with a picture of what’s inside, such as socks, shirts or hats. This helps your child locate what they want and then put things away.

 

Elementary School

Your child is old enough to get dressed and put away their laundry, so continue the good habits set when they were in preschool. It might be time to change out organizers for items that are more in scale. Adjust the hanging rod, and purchase larger bins that will hold their bigger clothes. You might add a small coat rack or ottoman to their room where they can lay out their outfit for the next day to help streamline mornings.

Teenagers

Teens need lots of storage, and when it comes to their closet they’ll likely have extra items to put away like sports gear, trophies, hats, accessories, and more. Closet organizers are key for making sense of it all, and it helps to get your child’s input. If they have a say in designing it, they’re more likely to use it. Built-in closet solutions can make space for clothes and shoes. You should also include a hamper so dirty clothing doesn’t wind up on the floor, and organize small items, such as jewelry, with bins or hangers.

By taking the time to create organizing systems that grow with your child, you help keep his or her room clean. And that’s something we can all enjoy!

Organizing a Child’s Bedroom

“Clean up your room” is a phrase most parents are familiar with. Kids and clutter often go hand in hand. Instead of shutting the door (which isn’t a bad option), give your child the tools for tidying by creating an organized space. Here are five things to keep in mind:

 

1. Look at the room from your child’s point of view. Often closets and drawers are too tall to be manageable. Get down to your child’s eye level and then assess his or her space. The view may surprise you! Shorter furniture, like a dresser instead of a chest of drawers, is more ideal for little kids. And make sure the closet is set up with low rods and baskets or bins on the floor.

2. Simplify. A room or closet filled to the brim is going to be hard to maintain. Take everything out of your child’s room that doesn’t need to be there. Store out-of-season or outgrown clothing in the basement or another room. Create a “toy library” where kids check out a certain number of toys and return them before they’re allowed to check out more. And clean out your child’s desk at the end of each school season to make sure old papers and books aren’t causing clutter.

 

3. Make sure the room has adequate storage. Getting ready in the morning will be a breeze when clothing options are readily accessible. A dresser will provide ample drawer space for storing socks, shirts and everything else. Use bookcases, baskets and benches for storing additional items that are kept in your child’s room, such as art supplies and toys. An organized room is easier to keep clean because there’s a place for everything.

 

4. Give your child a homework area. Studying, homework and projects are best completed at a desk where books and supplies can be stored. What’s more, when you put a desk in your child’s bedroom, you provide a quiet work environment away from the hustle and bustle of the household in which your child can get things done.

5. Create a daily routine. Set up a ritual where you and your child put items away before bedtime. As your child gets older, he or she can do the routine alone. When kids get in the habit of putting things away, clutter stays at bay and a room never gets out of control.

An organized bedroom is a place where your child can do his or her best, and it’s a spot where childhood memories take root and grow.